Posted by: Kathy Cassidy | November 13, 2008

Busted!

I’m not as good as Clarence Fisher, who can get kids expelled in another country, but I did feel a bit like Dick Tracy.

A few days ago, one of the students in my classroom received a comment that was not very nice.  It made fun of her writing ability.  In case you are not a regular reader of my six year old students’ blogs, I don’t edit their writing, but instead let it be an online portfolio of their developing ability to write.  The particular child who received the comment has not yet made the connection between sounds and letters in her writing.

Because I use Classblogmeister to host my classroom blog, the comment came to me for approval before it was posted, so I was able to delete it and she was never the wiser.  Her self-esteem is still firmly intact.

If it had been one of my students who had written the comment, I would want to know about it.  The student did not have a name that was familiar to me, but I went to the Sitemeter I have posted on my blog.  One of the options is “referrals”.  It gives the URL from which the person linked to my blog.  Since I knew what time the comment arrived in my email, it was easy to check and see where the referral had come from near that time.  I followed the link to another Classblogmeister blog, with the offending student’s name and the teacher’s email address clearly there.  The teacher wrote me back thanking me for the information, saying that she would be “definitely dealing with it”.

I am currently blogging with my fifth class of students, and this is the first time I can recall getting a comment from someone outside our classroom that was inappropriate.  A pretty good record, but it is good to know that if I do get something unsuitable for publishing, I can do something about it.

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Responses

  1. […] Kathy Cassidy’s blog. She really shares important aspects of blogging with young children. In this entry she talks about how she dealt with the first inappropriate comment received by one of her students […]

  2. Good for you! Just dealt with a similar issue today with a student virtual world and the chat feature. If we don’t reinforce good digital citizenship right from the beginning the future of our interconnected world is grim. Thanks for using technology wisely and safely!


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